pesticides

Number of breaks: 3

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When and where neonicotinoids are bad for bees

The impact of neonicotinoids on bees has always been a contentious issue, not least because reported evidence of their effects has been variable. Neonicotinoids are most often applied to crop seeds, rather than sprayed directly on plants. As the plant grows the pesticide moves though... global.click_to_read

  • Ben A. Woodcock | Ecological Entomologist at NERC, Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK
  • Matthew S. Heard | Plant Ecologist at NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK
  • Nadine Mitschunas | Field Ecologist at NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK.
  • Brigitta Raffa | Undergraduate Student at Szent-István University, 2103 Gödöllö, Hungary.
  • Dora Vaskor | Undergraduate Student at Szent-István University, 2103 Gödöllö, Hungary.
  • Áron Bihlay | Undergraduate Student at Szent-István University, 2103 Gödöllö, Hungary.
  • Judy A. Webb | Associate Researcher at NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK.
  • Richard F. Pywell | Biodiversity Science Area Head at NERC Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 8BB, UK.
Views 153
Reading time 4 min
published on Oct 26, 2017
The use of neonicotinoid pesticides affects wild bee populations

Bees are more than honey-makers. They pollinate crops and hence are key elements in our food production. Honeybees, wild bee species such as bumblebees and solitary bees, butterflies, wasps, and flies, all provide an invaluable work of pollination. In fact, a third of the food... global.click_to_read

  • Maria Sentandreu | Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Department of Botany and Plant Biology, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 102
Reading time 4 min
published on Jun 10, 2016
A dangerous habit: bees prefer pesticide-contaminated nectar

The impact of pesticides on pollinators is an important factor for the future of world food security, as well as a hotly debated and controversial topic. Pollinating insects like bees help to increase the yields of many food crops but, in doing so, are inadvertently... global.click_to_read

  • Sébastien Kessler | Research Associate at Institute of Neuroscience, University of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne, England
Views 173
Reading time 3 min
published on Feb 12, 2016