Evolution & Behaviour

showing 11-15 of 22 breaks

The mutation that allowed our brain to grow

During human evolution, one of the most remarkable events was the expansion of the upper layer of the brain: the so-called neocortex. This event took place about 2 million years ago and allowed us to develop the cognitive abilities that characterize modern day humans. In... global.click_to_read

  • Reinier Prosee | PhD student at Department of Molecular Biology, Section of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Geneva, Switzerland
Views 84
Reading time 4 min
published on Aug 24, 2017
Howler monkeys: living a life in colour helps finding better food

In terms of their ability to see colours, primates are unique compared to other mammals. Many primates have trichromatic colour vision and can see differences among red, orange, yellow, and green hues. What is particularly fascinating, however, is how much variation there is among primates... global.click_to_read

  • Amanda D. Melin | Professor at Department of Anthropology and Archaeology & Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute University of Calgary, AB, Canada
Views 83
Reading time 4 min
published on Jul 3, 2017
Human gut parasite has a sinister use for its stolen genes

It is well established knowledge that bacteria routinely exchange genes between unrelated species, creating an extensive network of information flow independent of sexual reproduction. By acquiring new genes, each being a blueprint for a single protein, the bacteria gain also the functions the proteins perform... global.click_to_read

  • Lukáš Novák | PhD student at Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic
Views 172
Reading time 3 min
published on May 18, 2017
Symbiogenesis: how algae and bacteria shaped new genes together

Genes are an essential component of every living being. They are encoded in the DNA, and contain the information needed to produce a fully-functional organism. Deciphering the origin of new genes in organisms is important to understand how living beings adapted to their environment. Genes... global.click_to_read

  • Raphaël Méheust | PhD student at Pierre and Marie Curie University - Paris 6, Unité de recherche Systématique, Adaptation, Évolution
  • Eric Bapteste | Professor at Pierre and Marie Curie University - Paris 6, Unité de recherche Systématique, Adaptation, Évolution
Views 118
Reading time 3.5 min
published on May 3, 2017
Amoebas trap bacteria using nets of DNA: the same mechanism as human immune cells

Our multicellular bodies containing trillions of cells seem to have little in common with protists, the tiny single-celled creatures inhabiting every drop of water, which spend their days eating bacteria or each other, parasitizing larger organisms or living from light. And yet, this is how... global.click_to_read

  • Lukáš Novák | PhD student at Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic
Views 195
Reading time 3.5 min
published on Jan 27, 2017